Health Tips Life Insurance

The following healthy living tips are compliments of Regence Blue Shield of Idaho:

If you want to avoid a second heart attack – get moving!
A study of 406 people who had a survived a first heart attack found those who remained at least moderately active had a 60 percent lower risk of a fatal or nonfatal heart attack. Those who remained very active had a 78 percent lower risk. The findings indicate that patients can’t give up exercise and activity at the end of their cardiac rehab programs, which typically last from 12 to 23 weeks. They should work with their therapists to design a home exercise program that picks up where rehab leaves off. An even better idea: Have the therapist write out a prescription for exercise. While the study makes no suggestions for specific types of exercise, the study said patients generally engaged in activities like gardening and jogging.

Live longer – Stop smoking
Every cigarette a man smokes reduces his life by 11 minutes. An article in the British Medical Journal says that each carton of cigarettes represents a day and a half of lost life. Researchers came to their conclusions by comparing the life expectancy of smokers and nonsmokers. Although the authors admit the calculation
is very rough, “it shows the high cost of smoking in a way that everyone can understand.”

Love your parents
Loving ties with middle-aged children does more to lengthen the life of elderly parents than any functional support. Research has found the elderly tend to live longer if they have practical aid – people who drive them to the doctor’s or help at home. There’s some evidence that feeling loved can stimulate hormones that strengthen the immune system. Depression also is known as a threat to cardiovascular health, so avoiding it may promote parent’s survival.

Infants and fluffy stuff don’t mix
Never put an infant on top of fluffy bedding, pillows, or comforters. According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, up to 30% of the 6,000 annual cases of sudden infant death syndrome may be caused by sleeping atop soft bedding, which may cover an infant’s mouth and nose.

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